Can Poor Oral Hygiene Damage My General Health?

Brunette woman wears a striped blue shirt & spreads her arms in front of the ocean, grateful for great overall health

What does your oral hygiene have to do with your overall health? The answer is: A lot more than you might think! Researchers are finding more and more evidence that there is a strong link between your oral health and your general health. If you weren’t motivated to visit Dr. Curtis before, perhaps the knowledge that healthy teeth and gums can lower your risk for a variety of different diseases and conditions will motivate you to improve your preventive care routine.

Gum Disease & Infection

Apart from being the number one cause of tooth loss in adults, gum disease can contribute to a whole host of other problems throughout your body. The buildup of plaque and subsequent gum infection and tooth decay can lead to harmful oral bacteria entering your bloodstream. If the infection in your mouth spreads to your throat, heart, lungs, or brain, it can become life-threatening!

Dry Mouth

When you think about your health, you might overlook the role saliva plays in regulating the bacteria that enters your body through your mouth and fighting disease. Believe it or not, saliva is your body’s first line of defense against infection! It contains antimicrobial elements that break down bacteria. Moreover, saliva washes away food particles before bacteria has a chance to feast upon them and produce tooth-decaying acid. When your mouth chronically does not produce enough saliva, mouth dryness can go from temporary discomfort to foul monster breath with advanced tooth decay and bodily inflammation and infection.

Acne

In addition to the risks of gum disease, infection, and dry mouth, scientists are realizing that there may even be a link between acne and oral health. Some studies have shown that the same oral bacteria that cause infected teeth can also cause the skin to breakout. Furthermore, if you are a dribbly tooth brusher, you may be leaving toothpaste residue around your mouth. Be sure to wash your face after brushing your teeth to avoid any skin irritation.

Protect Your Body with Great Oral Hygiene!

We encourage you to practice an outstanding preventive care routine. Brush your teeth twice daily for two minutes each time, brush your tongue every day, and floss at least once a day, and visit our office every six months for cleanings and exams. To schedule your next visit, contact our office today!

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